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o-ali-help:

Hawza in Shiraz, Iran.
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friendlycloud:

thepoliticalnotebook:

Protesters in New Delhi are hit with a police water cannon blast during their demonstration following the brutal gang rape of a 23-year-old woman, which has sparked  powerful protests in India’s capital in recent days.
[Saurabh Das/AP]

Countries ABC, protest: India
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maddynorris:

Drawing in the Corner, 1971

kldzbop:

officialnasa:

kldzbop:

how many star in the sky

Like 7 star

good job nasa keep up the good work

sancophaleague:

"Ola Orekunrin was studying to become a doctor in the UK a few years ago when her younger sister fell seriously ill while traveling in Nigeria. The 12-year-old girl, who’d gone to the West African country on holiday with relatives, needed urgent care but the nearest hospital couldn’t deal with her condition.

Orekunrin and her family immediately began looking for an air ambulance service to rapidly transport the girl, a sickle cell anemia sufferer, to a more suitable healthcare facility. They searched all across West Africa but were stunned to find out there was none in the whole region.

"The nearest one at the time was in South Africa," remembers Orekunrin. "They had a 12-hour activation time so by the time they were ready to activate, my sister was dead." (Cnn.com)

Orekunrin did the latter. Motivated by the tragic death of her sister, the young doctor decided to leave behind a high-flying job in the UK to take to the Nigerian skies and address the vital issue of urgent healthcare in Africa’s most populous country.

Flying helicopters, speaking Japanese

At 27, there isn’t much Orekunrin hasn’t achieved.

She is England’s Youngest Doctor.

Born in London, she grew up in a foster home in the charming seaside town of Lowestoft in the south-east of England.

Aged 21, Orekunrin had already graduated from the University of York as a qualified doctor. She was then awarded the MEXT Japanese Government Scholarship and moved to Japan to conduct research in the field of regenerative medicine.

After moving back to Europe the young doctor looked set for a promising career in medicine in the UK. But her desire to improve healthcare services in West Africa brought her back to her roots.

Orekunrin quit her job, sold her assets and went on to study evacuation models and air ambulance services in other developing countries before launching her ambitious venture, which enables her to combine her “deep love for medicine and Africa” with her growing passion for flying — Orekunrin is also a also a trainee helicopter pilot.” (CNN.COM)

Stand FOR SOMETHING!!!

Post Put together by @solar_innerg

#sancophaleague #BlackWomen #Nigeria #Orekunrin #Doctor #Success #blackexcellence


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Pablo Picasso
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citylandscapes:

Marrakech, Morocco. By Matheus Carvalho (instagram.com/m_carvalho_)
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travelandsun:

privacy by * onda * on Flickr.

artandsciencejournal:

Eruptions of Audiovisual Illusions

Inspired by the societal influences volcanoes have on our lives, artist Joanie Lemercier created two projects “EYJAFJALLAJÖKULL” (2010) and “FUJI” (2014) using a combination of simple and complex audiovisual elements, playing with our depth of field and perception of the installation environment.

In both installations, the artist hand draws the wire-frame scenery to a wall, mimicking the topography of the respective volcanic landscapes. Stereoscopy and shading are used as the key elements which manipulate the audience’s perception of the image before them. The shadows created by the light projections give the illusion of depth within the ridges and points, even distance between mountains, aided by the fluid grid-lines and computer software. The artist himself describes this process as “modifying the perception of things…it is almost like modifying reality”. Lemercier “[plays] around with visual perception [to] trick the senses using optical illusions”, allowing the naturally flat surface and image to take on a three-dimensional forms.

Both examples of audiovisual mapping stem from events that have shaped certain societies, in small and large ways respectively; “EYJAFJALLAJÖKULL” was created in response to the eruption of the volcano in Iceland in 2010, which restricted travel in almost all of Europe. “FUJI” continues the artists’ exploration of volcanoes, this time Fujiyama in Japan, by incorporating elements of the legend of Kaguya Hime; a 10th-century folk-tale which the artist claims is “a key element in Japanese culture”.

Where the first installation focused on optical illusion and manipulation of audiovisual perception only, “FUJI” does the same, but with the added bonus of narrative. The projection becomes both optical illusion and poetry within its immersive environment.

-Anna Paluch


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themountainsare:

Long Walk by Yves Lavignasse